Opportunities for Historians

The Society of Georgia Archivists Annual Meeting Program Committee proudly presents the theme for the 2022 annual meeting: Sustaining Archives: Practical Solutions for the Future.

DEADLINE: May 28, 2022

The Committee invites you to attend the meeting, to be held at the Jekyll Island Club, October 26–28, 2022.

Our 2022 hybrid program will focus on creating and sustaining practical tools, partnerships, and healthy work environments. Presentations will examine how archivists build practical approaches to workflows, teaching, collaborations, staffing, and healthy environments. The Program Committee seeks session proposals that highlight innovative research, applied projects, and collective insights that improve our understanding of archival work. While proposals on all aspects of archival practice and research will be considered, the Program Committee is especially interested in the following key topics:

  • Creating and implementing practical workflows, methods, and tools

  • Building sustainable staffing models and fostering healthy work environments

  • Developing and sustaining DEI initiatives in our institutions and the archival profession

  • Engaging with underrepresented communities and/or historically marginalized groups

  • Teaching and learning with archival materials in innovative ways

  • Dismantling silos and building collaborative partnerships internally and externally

  • Exploring environmental sustainability, disaster response, and the effects of climate change

The committee welcomes proposals from anyone involved with archives, including archival staff and volunteers, students, new professionals, community organizers, researchers, and allied professionals. We encourage potential presenters to consider how their proposed session will support the SGA Statement on Diversity and Inclusion.

Proposals can be submitted through the online submission form.

The deadline for proposal submissions is May 27, 2021.

Posted: April 6, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Phillips Fund for Native American Research

DEADLINE: May 31, 2022

For research in Native American linguistics and ethnohistory, focusing on the continental United States and Canada. Given for a maximum of one year from date of award to cover travel, tapes, and consultants’ fees.

Eligibility
Applicants may be graduate students pursuing either a master’s or a doctoral degree; postdoctoral applicants are also eligible.

Award
From $1,000 to $3,500

Deadline
March 1, 2022; notification in May.

Read more about the Phillips Fund for Native American Research

Posted: September 20, 2021
Tagged: Grants


CFP: Association for the Study of African American Life and History Annual Meeting

DEADLINE: June 16, 2022

Join ASALH for the 107th Annual Meeting & Conference
September 29 – October 1, 2022
Montgomery, AL

The theme for 2022 focuses on the importance of Black Health and Wellness. This theme acknowledges the various ways health and wellness can be described, including, but not limited, to medical health, mental health, nutrition, body positivity, financial wellness, creative arts, and physical activity. Additionally, it is important to note the intersection between financial wellness and medical and mental wellbeing.

In the Black community it is important to honor the legacy of not only Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, but also other ways of knowing (e.g. birth workers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.) throughout the African Diaspora. The 2022 theme considers activities, rituals and initiatives that Black communities have done to be well.

To foster good health and wellness Black people have embarked on self-determination, mutual aid and social support initiatives to build hospitals, medical and nursing schools (i.e. Meharry Medical College, Howard University College of Medicine, Provident Hospital and Training School, Morehouse School of Medicine, etc.) and community clinics. Clinics were established by individuals, grassroots organizations, and mutual aid societies, such as the African Union Society, National Association of Colored Women and Black Panther Party, to provide spaces for Black people to counter the economic and health disparities and discrimination that are found at mainstream institutions. While Black communities were creating hospitals, community health clinics, and medical colleges, they were also creating Black owned insurance companies and burial societies, financial institutions, credit unions, and businesses in efforts to empower their communities to be financially stable and well; and to keep the money in the community. These institutions worked to develop Black business districts and to improve the socioeconomic status of the Black community.

At this point in the 21st century, our understanding of Black health and wellness is broader and more nuanced than ever. Black health and wellness not only include one’s physical body, but also emotional and mental health. In the still overhanging shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic, Black people should and do use data and other information-sharing modalities to document, decry, and agitate against the interconnected, intersecting inequalities intentionally baked into systems and structures in the U.S. for no other reason than to curtail, circumscribe, and destroy Black well-being in all forms and Black lives. It was also during the pandemic that a light was shone on the glaring disparities in the insurance and pharmaceutical industries as well as the impact the lack of a living wage had on the health and wellness of those in the Black community. It became clear that individuals, organizations, and businesses were financially unwell and unable to handle a financial crisis. Some of these issues arose from bad financial decisions (i.e. debt, bad investments, lack of savings, the housing crisis, etc.) and denote the need for financial literacy and planning for future financial wellness.

Mindful of Sister Audre Lorde’s words, we are doing more to move forward holistically for the betterment of ourselves, our bodies, our relationships, our communities, and our planet.

We are determined to create a conference that shines a light on the multiple facets of Black health and wellness through education and activism.

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History’s Academic Program Committee seeks proposals that probe the traditional fields of economics, accounting, politics, medicine, psychology, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women’s/gender history as well as southern and western history; along with the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LGBTQIA, and queer history; environmental and public history; African American intellectual history; literature; and the social sciences. We look forward to proposals that center Black/African Diasporic health from multiple ontologies and epistemologies, embrace decoloniality, and engage embodiment. We encourage submissions from historians, students, new professionals, first-time presenters, information professionals, activists, financial planners, accountants, clinicians, community healers, health researchers, and health practitioners.

Proposal Types
Proposals should be detailed, comprehensive, and descriptive that outline the theme, scope, and aim of session. Details on each can be found on the ASALH website.

Papers: There will be limited slots for paper sessions at the ASALH annual meeting. Papers will ONLY be accepted by non-academics, undergraduate, and graduate students on the 2022 Annual Black History Theme: Black Health and Wellness. For those who do not fit into these categories the Academic Program Committee encourages you to use the Google spreadsheet, which is an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration. The spreadsheet is not monitored by ASALH or the Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process.

Panels, Workshops, Roundtables, Media, Woodson Pop-Ups, and Posters: Proposals that incorporate the annual theme are preferred, but submissions can be on a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in Black history, life, and culture. Proposals will be accepted by all affiliations and academic status. For individuals who are interested in collaborating on a panel, workshop, roundtable please use the Google spreadsheet, which is an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration. The spreadsheet is not monitored by ASALH or the Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process.

The All-Academic system will be open in January 2022. The submission deadlines for proposals are as follows: Early Bird Submissions will be accepted via All Academic until March 18, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). Conditional acceptance responses to Early Bird submissions will be sent out by April 18, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). After this date, the committee will accept all submissions until the deadline of April 30, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). Regular conditional acceptances submissions will be responded to by June 15, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). You will not be considered official until all session participants have joined the Association and registered for the conference.

Learn more about the ASALH Call for Papers

Posted: March 7, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


CFP: ASALH 2022 Annual Meeting and Conference – Black Health and Wellness

DEADLINE: June 17, 2022

Call for Papers
107th Annual Meeting and Conference
2022 Black History Theme – Black Health and Wellness
September 29, 2022 – October 1, 2022
Montgomery, Alabama

DEADLINE: April 30, 2022

The theme for 2022 focuses on the importance of Black Health and Wellness. This theme acknowledges the various ways health and wellness can be described, including, but not limited, to medical health, mental health, nutrition, body positivity, financial wellness, creative arts, and physical activity. Additionally, it is important to note the intersection between financial wellness and medical and mental wellbeing.

In the Black community it is important to honor the legacy of not only Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, but also other ways of knowing (e.g. birthworkers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.) throughout the African Diaspora. The 2022 theme considers activities, rituals and initiatives that Black communities have done to be well.

To foster good health and wellness Black people have embarked on self-determination, mutual aid and social support initiatives to build hospitals, medical and nursing schools (i.e. Meharry Medical College, Howard University College of Medicine, Provident Hospital and Training School, Morehouse School of Medicine, etc.) and community clinics. Clinics were established by individuals, grassroots organizations, and mutual aid societies, such as the African Union Society, National Association of Colored Women and Black Panther Party, to provide spaces for Black people to counter the economic and health disparities and discrimination that are found at mainstream institutions. While Black communities were creating hospitals, community health clinics, and medical colleges, they were also creating Black owned insurance companies and burial societies, financial institutions, credit unions, and businesses in efforts to empower their communities to be financially stable and well; and to keep the money in the community. These institutions worked to develop Black business districts and to improve the socioeconomic status of the Black community.

At this point in the 21st century, our understanding of Black health and wellness is broader and more nuanced than ever. Black health and wellness not only include one’s physical body, but also emotional and mental health. In the still overhanging shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic, Black people should and do use data and other information-sharing modalities to document, decry, and agitate against the interconnected, intersecting inequalities intentionally baked into systems and structures in the U.S. for no other reason than to curtail, circumscribe, and destroy Black well-being in all forms and Black lives. It was also during the pandemic that a light was shone on the glaring disparities in the insurance and pharmaceutical industries as well as the impact the lack of a living wage had on the health and wellness of those in the Black community. It became clear that individuals, organizations, and businesses were financially unwell and unable to handle a financial crisis. Some of these issues arose from bad financial decisions (i.e. debt, bad investments, lack of savings, the housing crisis, etc.) and denote the need for financial literacy and planning for future financial wellness.

Mindful of Sister Audre Lorde’s words, we are doing more to move forward holistically for the betterment of ourselves, our bodies, our relationships, our communities, and our planet.

We are determined to create a conference that shines a light on the multiple facets of Black health and wellness through education and activism.

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History’s Academic Program Committee seeks proposals that probe the traditional fields of economics, accounting, politics, medicine, psychology, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women’s/gender history as well as southern and western history; along with the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LGBTQIA, and queer history; environmental and public history; African American intellectual history; literature; and the social sciences. We look forward to proposals that center Black/African Diasporic health from multiple ontologies and epistemologies, embrace decoloniality, and engage embodiment. We encourage submissions from historians, students, new professionals, first-time presenters, information professionals, activists, financial planners, accountants, clinicians, community healers, health researchers, and health practitioners.

Proposal Types
Proposals should be detailed, comprehensive, and descriptive that outline the theme, scope, and aim of session. Details on each can be found on the ASALH website.

Papers: There will be limited slots for paper sessions at the ASALH annual meeting. Papers will ONLY be accepted by non-academics, undergraduate, and graduate students on the 2022 Annual Black History Theme: Black Health and Wellness. For those who do not fit into these categories the Academic Program Committee encourages you to use the Academic Program Committee Google spreadsheet, which is an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration. The spreadsheet is not monitored by ASALH or the Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process.

Panels, Workshops, Roundtables, Media, Woodson Pop-Ups, and Posters: Proposals that incorporate the annual theme are preferred, but submissions can be on a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in Black history, life and culture. Proposals will be accepted by all affiliations and academic status. For individuals who are interested in collaborating on a panel, workshop, roundtable please use the Academic Program Committee Google spreadsheet, which is an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration. The spreadsheet is not monitored by ASALH or the Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process.

Submission
All proposals should be submitted via the All Academic system

The submission deadlines for proposals are as follows: Early Bird Submissions will be accepted via All Academic until March 18, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). Conditional acceptance responses to Early Bird submissions will be sent out by April 18, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). After this date, the committee will accept all submissions until the deadline of April 30, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). Regular conditional acceptances submissions will be responded to by June 15, 2022, at 11:59 p.m. (EST). You will not be considered official until all session participants have joined the Association and registered for the conference.

Academic Program Committee Leadership
Arwin Smallwood, Chair
Darius Young, Vice Chair

Read More

Posted: April 21, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers, Meetings, Conferences, Symposia


The Oral History Association in Search for Host Institution and/or Executive Director

DEADLINE: July 1, 2022

The Oral History Association (OHA), the principal organization of practicing oral historians in the United States, is seeking a host institution and/or executive director beginning January 1, 2023, for a five (5) year commitment.

OHA will entertain a range of organizational options when it considers institutional hosts and executive leadership. Historical societies, museums, archives, independent administrators, colleges and universities are encouraged to submit proposals. Leadership might include an independently contracted executive director, or it might mean two people are co-directors.

OHA seeks an Executive Director with professional and scholarly experience with oral history, and demonstrated leadership, management, strategic planning, communication, and fundraising abilities. If applicable, the Executive Director works collaboratively with the host institution to foster a mutually beneficial relationship that includes new opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, enhanced cross-disciplinary collaboration, and dynamic community engagement. The new Executive Director and/or host institution will inherit a financially sound organization whose membership is committed to oral history as a rigorous practice that embraces democratic values.

Among their many responsibilities, the host institution and/or Executive Director are responsible for providing logistical and operational support to the OHA executive office in carrying out its duties, including any necessary human resources management, office space and equipment, and communications infrastructure (telephone, internet, etc.). Additionally, the Executive Director works with the Finance Committee to prepare annual budgets for approval by Council. Institutions interested in hosting the OHA’s offices or individuals interested in serving as independently contracted Executive Director are invited to send an initial expression of interest to the OHA by October 15, 2021 (See details below.) Viable candidates will be invited to submit a full proposal, due no later than February 18, 2022. A final decision is expected by April 2022, with a transition from the current host institution to the new offices anticipated to begin in June 2022.

Background
For more than sixty years, the Oral History Association has enjoyed a national and international reputation as a leader in the field of oral history. Its members include more than 900 individuals from a variety of disciplines and professional fields; and more than 180 institutions, including university programs and centers, libraries and archives, museums, historical societies, and community-based programs. The association hosts an annual meeting in the fall with an average attendance of 500. It publishes the electronic OHA Newsletter five times a year and sponsors the Oral History Review (OHR), the principal journal in the oral history field in the United States. Published by Routledge, the OHR editorial offices are currently located in and supported by the Science History Institute in Philadelphia. The OHA is governed by a nine-member Council. It is a member of the American Council of Learned Societies.

The association is guided by its mission to “connect and inspire practitioners and support their work to ethically collect, preserve, share, and interpret memories which foster knowledge and respect.”The OHA and its members have been central to the evolution of public and digital humanities during the past several decades and to fostering an appreciation for public humanities work in diverse formats and media. As a field, oral history lies at the intersection of numerous academic disciplines and professional practices: history and public history; folklore, sociology, anthropology and other fieldwork-based disciplines; archival management and library sciences; communication/s, film, journalism, linguistics and performance studies; narrative and memory studies; trauma studies; and gerontology. Oral history has become increasingly international in scope, as recent decades have seen the formation of professional organizations throughout the world and the maturation of the International Oral History Association. To see the current organizational Strategic Plan and for more information about the OHA, visit www.oralhistory.org.

Since 2018 the OHA executive offices have been hosted by Middle Tennessee State University and its operations overseen by two co-directors and supported by a program assistant. Under new leadership, the OHA seeks to expand its membership, further strengthen its national office, and advance new initiatives in the field.

Letter of Interest
Initial expressions of interest, due October 15, 2021, should include a preliminary explanation of factors that would make you an appropriate executive director or your institution an appropriate home, such as your vision for the organization and the field, how the OHA's presence would benefit your institution, as well as a description of available resources, facilities, personnel, programs, and relationships. If applicable, letters of Interest should indicate support from appropriate institutional administrators. Final proposals will require formal letters of support from these administrators.

While the OHA is open to considering a variety of arrangements, either institutionally based or independently supported, it does expect a significant commitment of resources to the executive office and staff. To help guide prospective applicants, we include here a more detailed Fact Sheet describing the OHA's needs and expectations.

The Search Committee is committed to working with prospective applicants as they prepare Letters of Interest. Please feel free to contact Search Committee Chair Lu Ann Jones (luann_jones@nps.gov) and committee members Kelly E. Navies (naviesk@si.edu) and Zaheer Ali (mail@zaheerali.com) to indicate your intent to pursue this opportunity and to address any questions you may have. Potential Executive Directors and/or representatives of institutions and organizations submitting a Letter of Interest should plan to meet with the Search Committee in late October, about the time of its virtual annual meeting. The Letter of Interest should be sent as an attachment to Search Committee Chair Lu Ann Jones with "Letter of Interest" in the Subject line.

Posted: September 20, 2021
Tagged: Around the Profession


CFP: Material Matters: It's in the Details Virtual Conference

DEADLINE: July 2, 2022

Call for Papers
Material Matters: It’s in the Details
Fort Ticonderoga’s Center for Digital History
January 21, 2023

Material Culture provides a unique way to engage with topics and individuals for which no written sources survive, providing an entry into lives and experiences otherwise lost to history.

This is especially important from a military point of view. Despite the literacy of a surprising number of European and American soldiers from the 18th century, artifacts used during military service provide a much broader range of sources and provide important perspectives into the military experience. The interaction with objects that crossed from civilian to military realms as well as engagement with items made specifically for military purposes all provide important opportunities to deepen our understanding of people’s experiences of warfare in the long 18th century.

Furthermore, artifacts created for military ends provide linkages back to the civilians that often created them, deepening the definitions, and broadening the boundaries of traditional military history. Military artifacts speak to the intersection of long-standing trade practices with the growing centralization, capitalization, and industrialization of fiscal military states that were developing in the 18th century. The Fort Ticonderoga Museum seeks papers relating broadly to material culture made, used, or altered in a military context. From soldier’s encounters with domestic furnishings on campaign, to the weapons designed and built for battle, military history and material culture are profoundly connected.

We are seeking out new research from established scholars in addition to graduate students, professionals, and artisans that relate to material culture made, used, or altered in a military context between roughly 1609 – 1815. Papers may engage but are not limited to:

  • Objects made for military purposes
  • Civilian objects used in military contexts
  • Archeological research into sites of military occupation
  • Ephemeral material cultures such as food or fuel
  • Military material culture crossing cultural, national, and geographic lines
  • Construction and fabrication of material culture
  • Craft, trade, experimental archeology, or living history perspectives on material culture
  • Art and representations of material culture in military contexts

This conference will be held online, using Zoom Webinars, on Saturday, January 21, 2023. Sessions are 30 minutes in length followed by 10 minutes for audience questions. Traditional illustrated papers, combined with live or recorded videos of trade practice or object analysis will all be accepted for consideration. Fort Ticonderoga may provide speakers with an honorarium. Please submit a 300-word abstract and CV by email by July 1, 2022, to Richard M. Strum, Director of Academic Programs: rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org

Learn more about Virtual Material Matters: It’s in the Details

Posted: May 4, 2022
Tagged: Meetings, Conferences, Symposia, Calls for Papers


CFP: The Conference on Women and the Civil War 2022

DEADLINE: July 25, 2022

The Society for Women and the Civil War
The Conference on Women and the Civil War 2022: Women of the Valley
July 22 – 24, 2022, in Harrisonburg, Virginia

The Society invites proposals for presentations examining the lives, service and contributions of Civil War-era women in the Shenandoah regional cultural area during intervals of peace, military campaigning, and occupation. It particularly welcomes presentations on the roles of women in agriculture; women replacing male labor on farms, in business, in education, and in transportation; the means by which educational systems continued despite disruptions; the effects of occupation on society and the economy; the protection and preservation of civilian resources during military campaigning and occupation; the impact of occupation and military rule upon civilians; defense of homes and property, and resistance against occupation; the roles of religious congregations in community assistance; relationships and interaction between different sociological groups in the area; women pacifists during the war; and the effects of technology upon women during the war. Proposals for presentations regarding other relevant topics will be welcomed for consideration.

Potential speakers should submit by electronic means:

  • A synopsis of the presentation, not more than three (3) pages. The synopsis must indicate why the presentation is related to the conference theme. It must also include a description of visual and physical aids used to illustrate and highlight the presentation, and identify the technology required to use the aids.
  • A bibliography of the sources used, with an emphasis on the primary sources.
  • A personal biography of not more than two (2) pages, including a listing of credentials, prior presentations (if any), publications (if any), and contact information. Links to on-line presentations made previously are considered quite useful.

Submissions will be evaluated principally upon the following criteria:

  • Originality of the topic.
  • Relevancy of the topic to the lives and efforts of women in the Civil War era and to the conference theme.
  • Quality of research, highlighting the use of primary sources.
  • Quality of the presentation, including the use of visual aids.
  • Presentation ability of the speaker.
  • Anticipated attendee interest level for the topic.
  • Originality of the presentation.

Submissions from graduate students are encouraged. Subjects examined from a micro-history perspective are also welcomed. Displays on topics related to the theme are welcome.

Please send submissions, and any questions or inquires, to: swcw1865@gmail.com
ATTN: 2022 Conference Speaker Proposals.

All Submissions must be received by November 1, 2021.

Posted: September 7, 2021
Tagged: Calls for Papers


27th Biennial Conference of the Nordic Association for American Studies in Uppsala, Sweden

DEADLINE: September 2, 2022

Please join us for the 27th Biennial conference of the Nordic Association for American Studies at Uppsala University May 25–27, 2023. The theme of the conference is “Crises and Turns: Continuities and Discontinuities in American Culture”.

We welcome panel and paper proposals that engage with continuities or discontinuities in American social, political, historical, or cultural life or within the field of American studies. We seek contributions in a wide array of disciplines, including, but not limited to history, politics, literature, film and media studies, sociology, art history, visual studies, gender studies, critical race and ethnicity studies, the environmental humanities etc. We also welcome papers on any topic related to American studies.

Deadline: September 1, 2022

Visit the NAAS website to learn more

Posted: April 6, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers


CFP: Trafalgar Chronicle, “The Natives of the Georgian Era – An International Perspective”

DEADLINE: September 2, 2022

For the 2023 edition of the Trafalgar Chronicle, the editors seek carefully researched articles on ‘The navies of the Georgian Era – an International Perspective’. We want research and analysis on the battles, operations, voyages and historically significant events and interactions concerning the world’s navies in the Georgian era, 1714 – 1837.

The Trafalgar Chronicle is the scholarly flagship publication of The 1805 Club, a non-profit organization with an international membership of scholars and enthusiasts of the Georgian maritime era. The 1805 Club takes its name from the iconic Battle of Trafalgar that gave Nelson his acclaimed place in history and confirmed the role of the Royal Navy in asserting Britain’s sea power.

Additional Topics: We also seek general interest articles with unique perspectives on the maritime and naval history of the Georgian era. We invite biographical portraits, articles about battles at sea, maritime economics, exploration of foreign shores, foreign relations, politics, etc. We also welcome well-documented reports on preservation efforts regarding the artefacts, graves, memorials, and monuments of the Nelson era.

Proposal Submission Guidelines: Please submit a proposal/abstract of no more than 500 words and a paragraph about your background (a biographical sketch). Proposals are due September 1, 2022. Applicants will be notified of acceptance status by October 1, 2022. Submit all proposals and inquiries to tc.editor@1805Club.org. Detailed author guidelines are available upon request.

Article Guidelines: Articles should be 3000 to 5000 words long in MSWORD (unprotected) following the Modern Humanities Research Association (MHRA) style guide. Please include 2 to 5 high resolution illustrations. Articles are due February 1, 2023, at which point they will be edited and, in some cases, submitted to peer review. Articles will be returned to authors for revisions by March 1, 2023. Revisions are due April 1, 2023. Publication will be Fall 2023.

While we do not pay our contributors, each author who is a member of The 1805 Club will receive a copy of the Trafalgar Chronicle upon publication. All authors will also receive a PDF of their published article for their portfolio, reprint requests, or to feature on a website or a blog. To join The 1805 Club, submit a membership application at www.1805Club.org.

Our Contributors: We welcome articles from 1805 Club members and anyone with an interest in the history of the Georgian Navy and other navies of the period. Our articles have come from writers of varied backgrounds: historians, journalists, university students, military personnel, preservationists, and novelists. Contact tc.editor@1805Club.org for additional information.

Read more about the Trafalgar Chronicle

Posted: May 4, 2022
Tagged: Calls for Papers


Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution

DEADLINE: September 26, 2022

Call for Papers
Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution
September 23–25, 2022

Fort Ticonderoga seeks proposals for the Eighteenth Annual Seminar on the American Revolution to be held Friday–Sunday, September 23–25, 2022.

Many states, as well as national entities, are already beginning the process of planning for the commemoration of the 250th anniversary of American Independence. Current events, from the end of America’s longest war of Afghanistan to fundamental questions about the democracy that was created nearly 250 years ago provide new context to explorations of one of the longest, bitterest, and most consequential conflicts in American history.

The Fort Ticonderoga Museum seeks proposals for new research on this critical period of the 18th century from a variety of perspectives, participants, and methodologies. Established scholars, graduate students, and others are encouraged to submit abstracts of papers broadly addressing the origins, conduct, or repercussions of the War for American Independence. We are especially interested in topics and approaches that engage the international nature of the conflict, representing the variety of peoples and places involved.

We welcome interdisciplinary backgrounds and approaches roughly covering the period from the 1760s to the 1780s. Papers may include or engage:

Material Culture

  • Biographical Analysis
  • Social and Cultural Histories
  • Global Theatres of War
  • Archaeological Studies
  • Indigenous Perspectives

Sessions are 30 minutes in length followed by 10 minutes for audience questions. Fort Ticonderoga may provide speakers with partial travel reimbursement. Please submit a 300-word abstract and CV by email by January 31, 2022, to Richard M. Strum, Director of Academic Programs: rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org

Learn more about the Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution

Posted: October 15, 2021
Tagged: Calls for Papers